Propulsion Machinery

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PAGE CONTENTS:
Introduction.
^ Pre-Mechanization.
^ ^ Human (Poles, Paddles, Oars,+).
^ ^ Animal (Treadmills, Towing Cables,+).
^ ^ Wind (Sails).
^ ^ Currents (River, Tidal,+).
^ Mechanized (incl. Land Tugs).
Power Sources.
^ External Combustion – Steam Engines (Wood, Coal, Bunker, Nuclear,+).
^ ^ Boilers (Tube,+).
^ ^ Reciprocating Piston Steam Engines: Expansion (Single, Double, Triple,+).
^ ^ Steam Turbines.
^ Internal Combustion – Spark Ignition & Compression Ignition.
^ ^ Reciprocating Piston Engines – 2 & 4-Stroke Cycle. Duty Ratings.
^ ^ ^ Mechanical: Cylinders, Heads, Pistons, Rods, Crankshaft, Valves,+.
^ ^ ^ Lubrication: Splash, Forced,+.
^ ^ ^ Fuel: Spark Ignition (Gasoline, LPG & Natural Gas,+) , Compression Ignition (Diesel,+),+.
^ ^ ^ Electrical: Cranking, Charging, Ignition,+.
^ ^ ^ Cooling: Air, Liquid (Water: Raw, Fresh,+),+.
^ ^ ^ Exhaust: Dry, Wet,+.
^ ^ Rotary Engines: Quasi-Rotary (Wankel), Pure-Rotary (BiQuad),+.
^ ^ Gas Turbines (Kerosene, Jet Fuel,+).
^ ^ Jet Engines (Kerosene, Jet Fuel,+).
^ ^ Rocket Engines (Rocket Fuel, Powdered Aluminum,+).
^ Electric Motors with Gensets, Fuel Cells, Batteries, Wind Generators, Solar Panels,+.
Power Transmission (Drive Train: Gears, Shafting, Bearings, Supports,+).
^ Inboards, Outboards, IOs, Z-Drives, L-Drives, Pods, Thrusters, Water Jet Drives,+.
Traction.
^ Paddle Wheels (Side, Stern,+).
^ Fans (Airboats, Air Cushion Craft,+)
^ Propellers (“Props”, “Screws”, “Wheels”,+), Impellers (Water Jet Drives,+),+.
Control Systems.
Instrumentation.
Impact Damage.
Vendor Directories: Engines, Marine Gears, Shafting, Propellers, Controls, Instrumentation,+.
Media: Articles, Books, Magazines, Videos, Websites, etc.


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The page may contain rough drafts that include raw source materials.


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Topic invertors

From Source.


Marine propulsion machinery is the mechanical system used to generate thrust to move a boat or ship across water. While paddles and sails are still used to propel some smaller boats, most modern ships are propelled by mechanical systems consisting of an engine turning a propeller via a non-shifting “Direct Drive” or a shifting “Marine Gear” that includes either the “In-Out Gear” providing forward and neutral, or the “Reversing Gear” providing forward, neutral, and reverse. Inboards (IB) include “Straight” Drives and “V” Drives. Inboard-Outboards (IO) include “Outdrives” of which most are “Stern Drives”. Other Drives include Outboards (OB), “Z” Drives, “L” Drives, Pod Drives, Hydraulic Drives, Electric Drives, and Hybrid Drives. Any of the drives may include a “Reduction Gear”. “Direct Drives” often connect the engine to a “Variable Pitch” propeller that provides forward, neutral, reverse, and feathering by controlling the blade angle.

SS Ukkopekka's triple expansion steam engine. GNU Wikipedia

SS Ukkopekka’s triple expansion steam engine. GNU Wikipedia

Steam engines were the first mechanical engines used in marine propulsion, but have mostly been replaced by more efficient internal combustion, reciprocating piston, 2-stroke or 4-stroke cycle petroleum fueled engines. Nuclear reactors producing steam that spin turbines are mostly limited to warships and icebreakers, as safety concerns have repressed attempts to utilize them to power commercial vessels. Battery powered electric motors have been used on submarines and electric boats and hold some promise in providing energy-efficient propulsion. Recent development in liquified natural gas (LNG) fueled engines are gaining recognition for their low emissions and cost advantages.

1 – External Combustion
1.1 – Steam
1.1.1 – Reciprocating Piston
1.1.2 – Turbine
1.1 – Fuel
1.1.1 – Wood
1.1.2 – Coal
1.1.3 – Oil
1.1.4 – Nuclear
2 – Internal Combustion
2.1 – Reciprocating Piston
2.1.1 – Cycles
2.1.1.1 – 2-Stroke Cycle
2.1.1.2 – 4-Stroke Cycle
2.1.2 – Ignition Source
2.1.2.1 – Spark Ignition
2.1.2.1.1 – Make & Break
2.1.2.1.2 – High Tension with Spark Plugs
2.1.2.2 – Compression Ignition
2.1.2.2.1 – Diesel
2.1.2.2.2 – Semi-Diesel
2.1.2.2.2.1 – Hot Bulb
2.1.3 – Fuel (Heavy to Light)
2.1.3.1 – Bunker
2.1.3.2 – Diesel
2.1.3.2.1 – BioDiesel
2.1.3.3 – Kerosene
2.1.3.4 – Gasoline/Petrol
2.1.3.5 – Alcohol (Ethanol, Methanol)
2.1.3.6 – Vapor
2.1.3.7 – Gas, Coal (CO)
2.1.3.8 – Gas, Production
2.1.3.9 – Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG: Propane, Butane,+))
2.1.3.10 – Natural Gas (NG)
2.1.3.10.1 – Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)
2.1.3.10.2 – Methane
2.2 – Rotary
3 – Electric
3.1 – Battery
3.2 – Fuel Cell


Power sources

Pre-Mechanization

Until the application of the coal-fired steam engine to ships in the early 19th century, animal and human labor, wind and/or currents were used to assist watercraft propulsion. Merchant ships predominantly used sail, but during periods when naval warfare depended on ships closing to ram or to fight hand-to-hand, galley were preferred for their maneuverability and speed. The Greek navies that fought in the Peloponnesian War used triremes, as did the Romans at the Battle of Actium. The development of naval gunnery from the 16th century onward meant that maneuverability took second place to broadside weight; this led to the dominance of the sail-powered warship over the following three centuries.

In modern times, human propulsion is found mainly on small boats or as auxiliary propulsion on sailboats. Human propulsion includes the push pole, oars, paddles and pedals turning a wheel or propeller.

Propulsion by sail generally consists of a sail hoisted on an erect mast, supported by stays, and controlled by lines made of rope. Sails were the dominant form of commercial propulsion until the late nineteenth century, and continued to be used well into the twentieth century on routes where wind was assured and coal was not available, such as in the South American nitrate trade. Sails are now generally used for recreation and racing, although experimental sail systems, such as the kites/royals, turbosails, rotorsails, wingsails, windmills and SkySails’s own kite buoy-system have been used on larger modern vessels for fuel savings.

External Combustion

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– Steam Engines (Wood, Coal, Bunker Fuel, Nuclear-Powered,+)

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Boilers

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(Tube,+)

Reciprocating Piston Steam Engines

Single Expansion, Multiple Expansion (Double, Triple,+)

The development of piston-engined steamships was a complex process. Early steamships were fueled by wood, later ones by coal or fuel oil. Early ships used stern or side paddle wheels, while later ones used screw propellers.

The first commercial success accrued to Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat (often called Clermont) in US in 1807, followed in Europe by the 45-foot Comet of 1812. Steam propulsion progressed considerably over the rest of the 19th century. Notable developments include the steam surface condenser, which eliminated the use of sea water in the ship’s boilers. This permitted higher steam pressures, and thus the use of higher efficiency multiple expansion (compound) engines. As the means of transmitting the engine’s power, paddle wheels gave way to more efficient screw propellers.

Steam turbines

Steam turbines were fueled by coal or, later, fuel oil or nuclear power. The marine steam turbine developed by Sir Charles Algernon Parsons raised the power-to-weight ratio. He achieved publicity by demonstrating it unofficially in the 100-foot Turbinia at the Spithead Naval Review in 1897. This facilitated a generation of high-speed liners in the first half of the 20th century, and rendered the reciprocating steam engine obsolete; first in warships, and later in merchant vessels.

In the early 20th century, heavy fuel oil came into more general use and began to replace coal as the fuel of choice in steamships. Its great advantages were convenience, reduced manpower by removal of the need for trimmers and stokers, and reduced space needed for fuel bunkers.

In the second half of the 20th century, rising fuel costs almost led to the demise of the steam turbine. Most new ships since around 1960 have been built with diesel engines. The last major passenger ship built with steam turbines was the Fairsky, launched in 1984. Similarly, many steam ships were re-engined to improve fuel efficiency. One high profile example was the 1968 built Queen Elizabeth 2 which had her steam turbines replaced with a diesel-electric propulsion plant in 1986.

Most new-build ships with steam turbines are specialist vessels such as nuclear-powered vessels, and certain merchant vessels (notably Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and coal carriers) where the cargo can be used as bunker fuel.

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LNG carriers

New LNG carriers (a high growth area of shipping) continue to be built with steam turbines. The natural gas is stored in a liquid state in cryogenic vessels aboard these ships, and a small amount of ‘boil off’ gas is needed to maintain the pressure and temperature inside the vessels within operating limits. The ‘boil off’ gas provides the fuel for the ship’s boilers, which provide steam for the turbines, the simplest way to deal with the gas. Technology to operate internal combustion engines (modified marine two-stroke diesel engines) on this gas has improved, however, such engines are starting to appear in LNG carriers; with their greater thermal efficiency, less gas is burnt. Developments have also been made in the process of re-liquifying ‘boil off’ gas, letting it be returned to the cryogenic tanks. The financial returns on LNG are potentially greater than the cost of the marine-grade fuel oil burnt in conventional diesel engines, so the re-liquefaction process is starting to be used on diesel engine propelled LNG carriers. Another factor driving the change from turbines to diesel engines for LNG carriers is the shortage of steam turbine qualified seagoing engineers. With the lack of turbine powered ships in other shipping sectors, and the rapid rise in size of the worldwide LNG fleet, not enough have been trained to meet the demand. It may be that the days are numbered for marine steam turbine propulsion systems, even though all but sixteen of the orders for new LNG carriers at the end of 2004 were for steam turbine propelled ships.

Nuclear-powered steam turbines

In these vessels, the nuclear reactor heats water to create steam to drive the turbines. Due to low prices of diesel oil, nuclear propulsion is rare except in some Navy and specialist vessels such as icebreakers. In large aircraft carriers, the space formerly used for ship’s bunkerage could be used instead to bunker aviation fuel. In submarines, the ability to run submerged at high speed and in relative quiet for long periods holds obvious advantages. A few cruisers have also employed nuclear power; as of 2006, the only ones remaining in service are the Russian Kirov class. An example of a non-military ship with nuclear marine propulsion is the Arktika class icebreaker with 75,000 shaft horsepower (55,930 kW). Commercial experiments such as the NS Savannah have so far proved uneconomical compared with conventional propulsion.

In recent times, there is some renewed interest in commercial nuclear shipping. Nuclear-powered cargo ships could lower costs associated with carbon dioxide emissions and travel at higher cruise speeds than conventional diesel powered vessels.

Internal Combustion

– Spark Ignition (Gasoline & Natural Gas) , & Compression Ignition (Diesel)

Reciprocating Piston Engines

The vast majority of modern marine engines are of the Reciprocating Piston – Internal Combustion type with either Spark Ignition (burning what is commonly called Gasoline in the US) or Compression Ignition (burning what is commonly called Diesel in the US).
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A modern diesel engine aboard a cargo ship
Most modern ships use a reciprocating diesel engine as their prime mover, due to their operating simplicity, robustness and fuel economy compared to most other prime mover mechanisms. The rotating crankshaft can be directly coupled to the propeller with slow speed engines, via a reduction gearbox for medium and high speed engines, or via an alternator and electric motor in diesel-electric vessels. The rotation of the crankshaft is connected to the camshaft or a hydraulic pump on an intelligent diesel.

The reciprocating marine diesel engine first came into use in 1903 when the diesel electric rivertanker Vandal was put into service by Branobel. Diesel engines soon offered greater efficiency than the steam turbine, but for many years had an inferior power-to-space ratio. The advent of turbocharging however hastened their adoption, by permitting greater power densities.

Diesel engines today are broadly classified according to:

  • Their operating cycle: two-stroke engine or four-stroke engine.
  • Their construction: crosshead, trunk, or opposed piston.
  • Their speed:
    • Slow speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed up to 300 revolutions per minute (rpm), although most large two-stroke slow speed diesel engines operate below 120 rpm. Some very long stroke engines have a maximum speed of around 80 rpm. The largest, most powerful engines in the world are slow speed, two stroke, crosshead diesels.
    • Medium speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed in the range 300-900 rpm. Many modern four-stroke medium speed diesel engines have a maximum operating speed of around 500 rpm.
    • High speed: any engine with a maximum operating speed above 900 rpm.

4-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine System
Most modern larger merchant ships use either slow speed, two stroke, crosshead engines, or medium speed, four stroke, trunk engines. Some smaller vessels may use high speed diesel engines.

The size of the different types of engines is an important factor in selecting what will be installed in a new ship. Slow speed two-stroke engines are much taller, but the footprint required is smaller than that needed for equivalently rated four-stroke medium speed diesel engines. As space above the waterline is at a premium in passenger ships and ferries (especially ones with a car deck), these ships tend to use multiple medium speed engines resulting in a longer, lower engine room than that needed for two-stroke diesel engines. Multiple engine installations also give redundancy in the event of mechanical failure of one or more engines, and the potential for greater efficiency over a wider range of operating conditions.

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Duty Ratings for marine diesel engines are most often determined to establish how hard the engine is worked to provide a reasonable service life in years. A heavy duty commercial engine will therefore have a continuous…

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High output engines with high horsepower ratings are therefore reserved for engines that are used very few hours per year (typically only a few hundred hours per year) and operated at full power only intermittently (typically  no more then one hour out of every eight hours) and the rest of the time operated at less then 80% power. DRAFT.

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As modern ships’ propellers are at their most efficient at the operating speed of most slow speed diesel engines, ships with these engines do not generally need gearboxes. Usually such propulsion systems consist of either one or two propeller shafts each with its own direct drive engine. Ships propelled by medium or high speed diesel engines may have one or two (sometimes more) propellers, commonly with one or more engines driving each propeller shaft through a gearbox. Where more than one engine is geared to a single shaft, each engine will most likely drive through a clutch, allowing engines not being used to be disconnected from the gearbox while others keep running. This arrangement lets maintenance be carried out while under way, even far from port.

LNG Engines

Shipping companies are required to comply with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) emissions rules. Dual fuel engines are fueled by either marine grade diesel, heavy fuel oil, or liquefied natural gas (LNG). A Marine LNG Engine has multiple fuel options, allowing vessels to transit without relying on one type of fuel. Studies show that LNG is the most efficient of fuels, although limited access to LNG fueling stations limits the production of such engines. Vessels providing services in the LNG industry have been retrofitted with dual-fuel engines, and have been proved to be extremely effective. Benefits of dual-fuel engines include fuel and operational flexibility, high efficiency, low emissions, and operational cost advantages. Liquefied natural gas engines offer the marine transportation industry with an environmentally friendly alternative to provide power to vessels. In 2010, STX Finland and Viking Line signed an agreement to begin construction on what would be the largest environmentally friendly cruise ferry. Construction of NB 1376 will be completed in 2013. According to Viking Line, vessel NB 1376 will primarily be fueled by liquefied natural gas. Vessel NB 1376 nitrogen oxide emissions will be almost zero, and sulphur oxide emissions will be at least 80% below the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) standards. Company profits from tax cuts and operational cost advantages has led to the gradual growth of LNG fuel use in engines.

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+
INTRO
+
The vast majority of modern marine engines are of the Reciprocating Piston – Internal Combustion type with either Spark Ignition (burning what is commonly called Gasoline in the US) or Compression Ignition (burning what is commonly called Diesel in the US).
+
Internal Combustion: Spark Ignited, Compresssion Ignited (Diesel).
^  Reciprocating Piston Engine Configurations: 2 & 4 Stroke Cycle. In-line and V, + 20 Others
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See DIY: Engines for articles on Engine Refitting, Repowering, Selection, Installation, Maintanance, Troubleshooting, and Repair

+

See How Piston Skirt Length Affects Engine Service Life.

Crosshead Engine

Beam Engine

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History

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Engine Systems

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Rebuild vs Repower (with Used or New)

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Marinizing the Petrol (Gasoline) Engine

The Marine engine is not quite the same as your standard car engine. There are certain things that need to be done to make it safe to operate within the environment of a boats engine bay.
The most notable differences between a marine engine and an automotive engine are the electrical system, the cooling system, the exhaust system, and the fuel system. Additionally, items such as heads and cams are usually different.
Here we will just cover a few of the differences to give you a flavour of the modifications that are made to a car engine to marinise it (this is not intended to be an exhaustive list).
In a car any petrol or vapour leak quickly disperses through the bottom of the engine bay. In a boat, the sealed engine compartment does not afford the same luxury. Therefore the electrical system is modified to eliminate the possibility of sparks occurring within the system. Marine starters and alternators are modified so they won’t release sparks and ignite and gas vapour that may be in the engine compartment.
Marine carburettors are modified so they won’t flood outside the carburettor. If there is a problem or there is too much fuel in the carburettor, it will flood back into the engine.
On a boat there is a constant flow of new water sucked up from the lake or the ocean which circulates through the cooling system (raw water cooling). This type of system is extremely corrosive to the pump especially if the boat sees salt water. An automotive style pump, with its stamped steel impeller, would fail due to corrosion in a short time. Therefore a marine pump with a special ceramic seal, stainless steel backing plate, and a bronze impeller to resist corrosion is usually fitted. Two other areas of the cooling system that are also marinised are the head gasket and the core plugs (which should be brass instead of steel)
More from Watermota
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Mechanical

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^  Reciprocating Piston Engine Configurations: 2 & 4 Stroke Cycle. Aspiration: N & T.

^ ^ Stroke Ratio: Square, Oversquare and Undersquare Engines.

^ ^ Piston configurations. Crosshead Piston.

^ ^ Crankshaft Orientation: Horizontal (IBs) & Vertical (OBs)

^ ^ Crankshaft Configuration: CrossPlane.

^ ^ Connecting Rod Configuration: Crosshead.

^ ^ Cylinder Orientation: u… = Upright (Vertical). s… = Slanted (Inclined).
^ ^ ^ i… = Inverted. h… = Horizontal (Flat).
^ ^ Cylinder Configuration: …S = Single Cylinder. …T = Twin Cylinder. …I = In-Line. …V = V Pattern (eg V8, V6).
^ ^ ^ …W = W Pattern. …Y = Y Pattern. …X… = X Pattern. …+… = + Pattern. …D… = Delta (Δ).
^ ^ ^ …R,R2,R3,R4 = Radial (Single,Double,Triple,Quad Banks). …® = Radial Rotary.

Con Rods: Crosshead.

^ ^ Piston Orientation:
^ ^ ^ …o = Outward Facing Opposed Piston (eg Boxer, FlatFlat-six engine). …i = Inward Facing Opposed Piston (O-P).

^ ^ ^ Engines with Inherently weak “Bottom Ends”.

^ ^ ^ ^ ~Engine Hydrolocking
^

Engine Cylinder Block Deck: Open, Semi-Closed, Closed.

Valve Train: Ports, Sleeve Valves, Side Valves, OHV, OHC, DOHC

Engine Cylinder Head: Integral in Block, Flat Head, VIH,

…r = Rotary. …w = Wankel.
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Lubrication

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Splash
Forced
^  Pressurized: Partially, Fully
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Fuel

DRAFT

Fuel Fundamentals:

In order to troubleshoot an engine, it is imperative that one understands what goes on inside an engine, specifically – Combustion, which consists of ignition and oxidation of Hydrocarbons.

What we need to know, we learned in grade school, but quickly forgot. Here is a reminder.

These chemical processes involve a few simple chemical/physics principles:

Where do these hydrocarbons come from? One could say “Common engine fuels are created synthetically using energy from a nuclear reactor” and this would be accurate as organic hydrocarbons are created during photosynthesis using sunlight from our local “nuclear reactor” in the sky.

When fuel is ignited and oxidized: HXCX + O2 → H2O + CO2 + E (E = Energy)
Or  SHTCU + vO2 → YH2O + ZCO2 + E
(Gasoline, Diesel, Natural Gas, CNG, LNG, LPG, Propane)
^ Alcohols and Ethers (MTBE).
^  Octane, Cetane
^ ^ Tetraethyl lead (Wiki).

Combustion (Wiki)

Aspiration:

The Atomic 4’s simple side-valve design however does suffer a few inherent limitations. Since the combustion chambers are off to the side of the cylinder…
limited compression ratio that is attainable due to the large amount of space required for the side valves to open into the combustion chamber.
The side-valve design was popularized in Ford “Model T’s”, “Model A’s, and “Flat-Head V8’s”.
Surprisingly, the side-valve design is making a comeback in light aircraft engines. Read more about the Belgian D-Motor flat-fours and flat-sixes at Wikipedia.

Ignition Source: Spark, Compression
Gasoline: Carburetion, Injection (Electronic)
^ Rinda.com.
^ ^ Troubleshooting MEFI.
^ ^ TechMate Marine Scan Tool.
^ ^ TechMate Pro Marine Scan Tool.
^ ^ MerCruiser Scan Tool.
^ ^ CodeMate Code Reader.
^ ^ DIACOM Marine PC Software.
^ ^ ^ Diacom Software Training Videos:
^ ^ ^ ^ 1 – How to install the Diacom program.
^ ^ ^ ^ 2 – An overview of key Diacom features.
^ ^ ^ ^ 3 – How to choose a sterndrive or inboard system type.
^ ^ ^ ^ 4 – How to choose a Mercury outboard system type.
^ ^ ^ ^ 5 – How to record engine data and email a data file.
^ ^ ^ ^ 6 – An in-depth look at Fault Codes on various ECM types.
^ ^ ^ ^ 7 – Downloading calibration files into ECMs (ECM reflashing).
^ ^ ^ ^ 8 – Diacom cable information and software updates.
^ ^ ^ ^ Behind the Scenes: See the hi-tech Diacom cable assembly process at our in-house design and manufacturing facility.
^ ^ ^ ^ Click here for videos on the Rinda Tech YouTube Channel.
^ ^ ^+
^ ^ ^+

Diesel: Mechanical Injection, Electronic Injection (Common Rail)

Section under construction.

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Control Systems
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Marcel Borcila, B.A. from The Ohio State University
Answered Dec 27, 2017

Intercoolers and After-coolers are identical devices serving the same purpose. In general, an intercooler or aftercooler is said to be a Charge-Air Cooler. A Charge-Air Cooler is used to cool engine air after it has passed through a supercharger such as a turbocharger, but before it enters the engine.

There is some confusion in terminology between aftercooler, intercooler, and charge-air cooler. In the past, aircraft engines would run turbochargers in stages, where the first stage compressor would feed the inlet of the second stage compressor that would further compress the air before it enters the engine. Due to the extremely high pressures that would develop, an air cooler was positioned between the first and second stage compressors. That cooler was the “Intercooler”. Another cooler would be positioned after the second stage, which was the final compressor stage, and that was the “aftercooler”. An aftercooler was the cooler whose outlet fed the engine.

An intercooler is basically an air-to-air radiator. The hot air from the turbo enters at one end, and as cooled as it passes through the intercooler (much like the water in a car’s radiator) before entering the engine at a much lower temperature. This allows the engine to make full use of a simple principal of physics; cooler air is more dense than hotter air. This basically means that for a given volume (of our engine’s cylinder for example) we can get more oxygen into the same space when the air is denser – and more oxygen means better performance.

It is usually best to refer to these charged- air coolers using the same term as the device’s manufacture in order to avoid confusion.

From Quora

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Electrical

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Cranking Circuits
^  Batteries
Charging Circuits
Instrumentation (see Propulsion)
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Cooling

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Air Cooling
^  Air Only
^  Air & Water (w/Radiator)
Water Cooling
^  Raw Water Cooling (Seawater)
^  ^  Raw Water Pumps
^  ^  ^  Jabsco
^  ^  ^  Johnson
^  ^  ^  Sherwood
^  Fresh Water Cooling (w/Keel Cooler)
^  Hybrid Raw & Fresh Water Cooling (w/Heat Exchanger) where a Fresh Water Cooling side is cooled by a Raw Water Cooling side. This is the common arrangement in a modern vessel.
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Exhaust

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Dry Exhaust
Wet Exhaust
^ w/Water Separator
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Mounting

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Hard Mounting (Solid)
Soft Mounting (Captive, Non-captive)
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Rotary Engines

Wankel (Quasi-Rotory where the rotor rotates around the rotating  eccentric shaft giving it an unfixed axis)

Wankel Rotary Engine

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BiQuad (Pure Rotary where all moving masses rotate around fixed axes)

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Gas turbines

(Kerosene, Jet Fuel)

Many warships built since the 1960s have used gas turbines for propulsion, as have a few passenger ships, like the jetfoil. Gas turbines are commonly used in combination with other types of engine. Most recently, the Queen Mary 2 has had gas turbines installed in addition to diesel engines. Because of their poor thermal efficiency at low power (cruising) output, it is common for ships using them to have diesel engines for cruising, with gas turbines reserved for when higher speeds are needed however, in the case of passenger ships the main reason for installing gas turbines has been to allow a reduction of emissions in sensitive environmental areas or while in port.[5] Some warships, and a few modern cruise ships have also used steam turbines to improve the efficiency of their gas turbines in a combined cycle, where waste heat from a gas turbine exhaust is utilized to boil water and create steam for driving a steam turbine. In such combined cycles, thermal efficiency can be the same or slightly greater than that of diesel engines alone; however, the grade of fuel needed for these gas turbines is far more costly than that needed for the diesel engines, so the running costs are still higher.

Jet Engines

(Kerosene, Jet Fuel)

Rocket Engines

Electric with Gensets, Wind Generators, Batteries, Fuel Cells, Solar, etc


Traction

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Drive Types

In-Line Inboard
V-Drive Inboard
Hydraulic Inboard
Electric Inboard
Pod Drive
Sail Drive
Inboard-Outboard
Outboard
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Paddle wheels

The paddle wheel is a large wheel, generally built of a steel framework, upon the outer edge of which are fitted numerous paddle blades (called floats or buckets). The bottom quarter or so of the wheel travels underwater. Rotation of the paddle wheel produces thrust, forward or backward as required. More advanced paddle wheel designs have featured featheringmethods that keep each paddle blade oriented closer to vertical while it is in the water; this increases efficiency. The upper part of a paddle wheel is normally enclosed in a paddlebox to minimise splashing.
Paddle wheels have been superseded by screws, which are a much more efficient form of propulsion. Nevertheless, paddle wheels have two advantages over screws, making them suitable for vessels in shallow rivers and constrained waters: first, they are less likely to be clogged by obstacles and debris; and secondly, when contra-rotating, they allow the vessel to spin around its own vertical axis. Some vessels had a single screw in addition to two paddle wheels, to gain the advantages of both types of propulsion.
From: Wikipedia

Screws

(Inboard, Outboard, IO, Z, L, Pod, Water Jet,+)

Main article: Propeller
Marine propellers are also known as “screws”. There are many variations of marine screw systems, including twin, contra-rotating, controllable-pitch, and nozzle-style screws. While smaller vessels tend to have a single screw, even very large ships such as tankers, container ships and bulk carriers may have single screws for reasons of fuel efficiency. Other vessels may have twin, triple or quadruple screws. Power is transmitted from the engine to the screw by way of a propeller shaft, which may or may not be connected to a gearbox.

 Propellers

Fans (Airboats using aircraft-type propellers) (Hovercraft)

Water Jet Drives


Control Systems

Cable and Pulley

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Push-Pull

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Hydraulic

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Electric / Electronic

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Control Systems Manufacturers

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Instrumentation

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Impact Damage

+


Directories of Vendors


Forum Posts, Tech Notes & Tech Tips

TYPE:
TITLE (Notes) — Creators (Authors‚ Editors‚ Publishers‚ Directors‚ Actors‚+) – Source DS
Forum Posts:
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
Tech Notes:
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
Tech Tips:
Foley Engines Dr. Diesel's Tech Tips
#1: Blend The Oil – Perkins Diesel
#3: Metric to Fractional Conversion
#4: Adventures in Oil
#5: Perkins and Deutz Gasket Paper; What to Use in a Pinch
#6: Diesel Rod Reconditioning
#7: Continental Tappett Settings
#8: Ford 172/192 Industrial Engine
#9: How to Install a Continental or Perkins Water Pump Pulley
#10: Torque Values and Valve Settings
#11: Twist Wrenches‚ Not Your Career
#12: Perkins Sleeves Made Simple
#13: Leaking Deutz‚ Deere‚ Perkins or Ford Industrial Exhaust Manifold?
#14: Using Oil Analysis to Avoid Downtime – Part 1
#15: Pulling an Engine
#16: The Perkins 4107/8 Rides Again
#17: Working on Deutz or Perkins Industrial Engines? 3 Unexpected Uses for Grease
#18: Oil Analysis Procedures
#19: Engine Diagnostics for Dummies
#20: Perkins Serial Numbers
#21: Identifying Wisconsin Engines
#23: Oil filters: Capacity Counts
#24: Ford 300 Industrial Downdraft Carburetors
#25: Break-in Oil: Not Synthetic
#26: Foley Engines Clean Air Tip
#27: Improving Oil Drain-back Time on your Perkins‚ Deutz‚ or Deere Industrial Engine
#28: Selecting and Installing A High Output Alternator
#29: Frozen Distributor?
#30: Installing a Cylinder Head
#31: Extending Valve Spring Life on your Deutz‚ Deere‚ or Perkins engine
#32: Deutz and Perkins Pistons: Design and Selection
#33: Disposing of used Lube Oil
#34: Atomic 4 Carburetors and Pumps
#35: Working on a Perkins or Deutz with a Balky or Unusual Fastener?
#36: First Level Maintenance Considerations for Perkins Diesels
#37: Perkins Fuel System Seal Kits
#38: Foley Pulley to the Rescue for Perkins 4107/108’s
#39: How to Install a Wisconsin‚ Continenta‚ Perkins or Ford Ignition Coil
#40: Walker Airsep Systems
#41: SAE Bell Housings Made Easy!
#42: Install a new Balmar Alternator on your diesel or gas powered marine engine
#43: GM 4.3 V6 Industrial Engine Identification Made Easy
#44: High Amp Alternator Difficult to Mount
#45: Alternators‚ Batteries‚ Regulators‚ Solar Panels‚ Revisited
#46: Starting Wisconsin Engines With High Loads
#47: Avoiding Idle Gears
#48: Maintaining Your Rockford and Twin Disc Power Takeoff Clutch
#49: Working on a John Deere engine without a manual?
#50: Raw Water Pump Maintenance
#51: Souping up the Series 72 Borg Warner
#52: Solid State Ignition Kits
#53: Header Wraps and Tailpipe Blankets
#55: Cummins B Series Tachometers
#56: Spark Plug 101
#57: All You Need to Know to Ship Your Deutz or Perkins Engine
#58: Bleeding Lucas‚ Stanadyne‚ and Diesel Kiki Fuel Systems
#60: Perkins Exhaust Elbows and Flange: Now in Stainless Steel!
#62: Installing a Hot Water Heater
#63: GM 5.7 Litre Industrial Engine Identification Made Easy (Part 1)
#64: Water Pump Pulleys
#65: The Nuts‚ Belts‚ and Bolts of Alternator Maintenance
#66: Repairing Raw Water Pumps
#67: How to Remove A Troublesome Pilot Bearing (Part 1)
#68: Foley Engines Head Installation Check List
#69: Working on Deutz‚ Deere and Perkins Industrial Engines? 7 Steps to Waking Up the Hibernating Engine–Gently
#70: Perkins/Westerbeke Elbows and Flanges (Part 2)
#71: How Often Should I Change My Lube Oils?
#72: Saving Worn Deutz‚ Continental and Wisconsin Blocks
#73: 3 Ways to Make Your Twin Disc or Rockford Power Takeoff Last Longer
#74: 8 Reasons to Remote Mount Your Perkins or Deutz Oil Filter
#75: Overcoming Cam Problems in GM 4.3 V6 Vortec Industrial Engine
#76: The Nuts and Bolts of Con Rod Reconditioning
#77: Identifying your Kubota Four Cylinder Diesel
#79: Kubota 2203 Identification: A Field Guide
#80: Governors on Industrial Engines: a Brief Overview
#81: Identifying the GM 8.1 Liter Industrial Engine
#82: Bleeding Perkins‚ Deutz‚ and Deere Fuel Systems (Part 2)
#83: Deutz Diesel Crankshafts: A Cautionary Note
#84: Ensuring Head Gasket Longevity on Continental Industrial Engines
#85: Identifying and Maintaining the Ford C6 Transmission as Used in Industrial Applications
#86: Deutz Diesel Fuel Systems: How to identify the correct Deutz 912 Diesel Series Fuel Pumps and Injectors
#87: Perkins‚ Ford‚ White-Hercules‚ Continental and Chrysler Water Pumps
#88: Identifying John Deere PowerTech Engines
#89: Working on Deutz‚ Deere and Perkins Industrial Engines? 4 Great Steps for Mechanics Going “Greener”
#90: Six Points You Need to Know About Deutz 912/913 Diesel Liners
#91: Alternators for Perkins Engine Models 4108‚ 4203‚ 4236 and 6354
#92: Identifying the Ford Dover and Dorset Engines
#93: Twin Disc® and Rockford Power Take Offs
#94: Ford 460 Industrial Engine
#95: Removing a Troublesome Pilot Bearing (Part 2)
#97: GM 5.7 Industrial Engine Identification Made Easy (Part 2)
#98: A New Way to Identify John Deere Engines
#99: Chrysler LH318 Industrial Engines; An Alternative Oil Filter
#100: Solving the Perkins 4108 Diesel Rear Seal Leak Problem
#102: Installing a Continental Engine Water Pump
#103: Diesel Exhaust Scrubbers: 4 Easy Steps to Ordering an Exhaust Scrubber
#190: Turbocharger Installation Instructions
#107: What To Do With Your Money? Dr Diesel Comes Up With a Solution That Mrs. Robinson Would Approve
#108: 6 Things to Know Before Ordering Your Cummins 5.9 or 8.3 Industrial Engine
#110: Kubota 2203 Engine Kits: A Quick Guide
#111: Power Take-Off Clutches for Wood Chippers
#112: Spin-on Fuel Filters for Perkins Diesels
#113: Prolonging the Life of Your Twin Disc or Rockford PTO
#114: Available SAE Housing Sizes‚ Available Clutch Sizes‚ Torque Capacities & Key Dimensions
#115: Cummins A/Onan L Series Water Pumps
#116: Curing Excessive Side Load Problems With Twin Disc and Rockford PTOs
#117: Ford 172 and Ford 192 Distributors and Drive Rods
#118: Super Sizing Rockford and Twin Disc or Auto Clutch Power Takeoff Clutch Pilot Bearings: Prolonging the Life of Your PTO – (Part 3)
#119: Identifying the Ford 460 Industrial Engine
#120: How to Order a Kubota 2003 Engine Overhaul Kit: Five Easy Questions
#121: How To Order Parts For The Ford VSG Series Engine
#122: Diesel Particulate Filters: 9 Easy to follow points
#123: Chrysler LH318 and LH360 Industrial Engines: How to Identify Them
#124: How to Time a Perkins Engine
#125: Deutz Diesel and Ford Industrial Engine Timing Belts: All You Need to Know to About Deutz and Ford Timing Belts
#126: Not Your Father’s Perkins 4108; Bringing the Perkins 4108 into the 21st Century
#127: Chrysler Industrial Engines: How to Identify the IND30‚ IND31‚ IND32 and IND33 Chrysler Flatheads
#128: Avoiding an Early Failure with a Deutz 1011 / 2011 Rebuilt
#129: Ford 172 and Ford 192 Industrial Engine Distributor Drive Rod
#130: How to Get More Life Out of Your AutoClutch Power Takeoff
#131: Perkins 4236 Diesel and Ford 300 Industrial Pilot Bearing Holders
#132: How To Prevent Zenith Carburetor Icing
#133:Twin Disc and Rockford Power Take Off Clutches; Pay Now or Pay More Later?
#134: How to Identify a Cotta Transmission
#135: Perkins and Deutz Gaskets: How to Make Them in a Pinch
#136: Upgrading A Hoof Or Pierce Belt Drive Governor To An Electronic Governor
#137: Ford BSD444T: How to Tell the Difference between Early and Late Models
#138: Electronic Governors: Upgrading a Belt Drive Hoof or Pierce (Part Two)
#139: Diesel Particulate Filter Maintenance
#140: Continental TM27 and TMD27 Oil Consumption Problems
#141: Deutz Diesel Engine Model 1013 Fuel Transfer Pumps
#142: Ford 330 Industrial Engines: Identifying the Dorset and the Dagenham Models
#143: How NOT To Seat the Piston Rings on Your New Ford 300 Industrial Engine; Cleaning Components When Swapping Accessories
#144: Deutz 1011 and 2011 Timing Belt Tension
#145: Installing an Electronic Governor: Five Easy Tips
#146: Yanmar Engine Tag Locations
#147: Running a Twin Disc/Rockford PTO? Want It To Last Longer?
#148: Ford Industrial In-Line 6 Cylinder Gas Engines: How to Tell Them Apart
#149: Deutz 1011/2011 Timing Belt Damage: Three Considerations in Replacing a Deutz 1011/2011 Timing Belt
#150: How to Identify Deutz 912 Engine Fuel Injectors
#151 Deutz Model 1011 & 2011 Thermostats: “Spring Ahead‚ Fall Back”
#152: Ford 300 Industrial Engines
#154: AutoClutch Power Takeoff Clutches
#155: Chrysler LH318 & LH360 Industrial Engines: Easy Block Repair
#156: Deutz 1011 & Deutz 1011F Diesel Piston to Wall Clearance
#157: How to Identify the Ford 300 Industrial Engine
#158: Power Takeoff Clutch Maintenance: How to Remove a Troublesome Pilot Bearing (Part 3)
#159: Deutz 912 Engines: The Difference Between New Generation 912 vs. Old Generation 912 Engines Made Easy
#160: Deutz Diesel Electronic Shutoff Solenoid Selection
#161: Handy Numbers for Perkins Diesel Owners or Rebuilders
#162: Cummins B Series Injector Protrusion
#163: Cummins 4 and 6 B Series Short Block Upgrades
#164: Upgrading Your Twin Disc/Rockford or Auto Clutch PTO
#165: Deutz 912 Diesel Connecting Rod Bolts
#166: Block Heaters‚ Glow Plugs‚ and Immersion Heaters for your Perkins‚ Deutz or Ford Industrial Engine
#167: Twin Disc‚ Rockford and AutoClutch Power Takeoffs and Pulleys
#168: Deutz 1011 and 2011 Timing Belt Change Intervals; All You Need to Know About Deutz Timing Belt Change Intervals
#170: All You Need to Know to Install a Deutz‚ Perkins or Deere Crankshaft
#171: Deutz Head Gaskets: Composite or MLS?
#172: A Five Point Checklist on Deutz Head Bolts and Torque Values
#173: How to Remove a Perkins 4.108 Injection Pump in Two Easy Steps
#174: Five Points to Keep in Mind When Overhauling a Deutz 1011 or Deutz 2011 Diesel Engine
#175: Deutz 2011 Timing Belts; How to Remove the Plastic Cover on the Deutz 2011 Timing Cover When Changing a 2011 Belt
#176: 120 Series Electric Actuator
#177: Crankshaft Installation Tips
#178: Deutz 1012/1013 Cooling System Purge Instructions
#179: Dr. Diesel’s Turbocharger Installation Manual
#180: EPA Tier 3 Deutz Engine Specs
#181: Exhaust Purifier Installation Procedures
#182: Foley Universal Governor Installation Guide
#183: How To Install A Lucas CAV/Delphi Pump
#184: How to Break-In a Remanufactured Deutz or Perkins Engine
#185: Installation Instructions for Complete Distributors
#186: Isuzu Industrial Diesel Engine Serial Number Location
#187: Notes on Installing Twin Disc/Rockford Power Takeoffs
#188: Perkins Engine Number and Location Guide
#190: Turbocharger Installation Instructions
#191: How to Upgrade an AutoClutch PTO
#192: Perkins 4.107/4.108 Stainless Steel Exhaust Elbows
#193: Deutz 1011 and Deutz 2011 Electronic Shutoff Solenoids
#194: How to Identify Ford VSG411 and VSG413 Starters
#195: How to Identify Perkins 4.107 and 4.108 Lift Pumps
#196: Ford 300 Ring Gears Made Easy
#197: How to Identify Your Ford Industrial Model Year
#198: Wisconsin and Continental Solid State Distributor Installation Made Easy
#199: Deutz Engine Serial Number Location Made Easy
#200: Rebuilding Deutz Connecting Rods
#201: Wisconsin Two Cylinder Cast Iron Engines: How to Tell the TJD from the THD
#202: Ford CSG649i / Ford 300 Cylinder Head Differences Made Easy
#203: Deutz and Perkins Turbocharger Maintenance Made Easy
#204: How to Identify the Hercules G1600 Engine
#205: Twin Disc or Rockford Not lasting as Long as it should? Here’s an Easy Fix
#206: Twin Disc and Rockford PTO Lubrication: How Often and How Much should I Lubricate my Power Takeoff?
#207: Twin Disc IBF314 Power Takeoff Clutch
#208: Perkins 1000 Series Connecting Rods: Fractured or Serrated?
#209: Ford LSG423 Gasket Identification Made Easy
#210: Twin Disc Clutch Adjustment
#211: How to Identify the Hercules D2000‚ D2300‚ D3400‚ G2000‚ G2300 and G3400 Engines
#212: Identifying the Ford 460 Water Pump
#213: Working on a Deutz 511 engine? Here’s How to Find the Serial Number
#214: AutoClutch PTOs Made Easy
#215: The Ins and Outs of Engine Block Heaters
#216: Governors and the Battle Setting
#217: How to Order a Deutz 1011 / 2011 ESO in Two Easy Steps
#218: Twin Disc Power Takeoff Clutch Pack or Complete Unit? How to Decide
#219: How to Prolong the Life of Your Rockford 4-25754 Clutch
#220: Helpful Information for Deutz 912‚ 913 and 914 Oil Cooler Installation
#221: Ford 300 Water Pump Identification
#222: Deutz 1011 and 2011 Timing Belt Installation Made Easy
#223: Installing Deutz 1011 / 2011 Injection Pumps and Setting the Rack
# 224: How to Install a New Perkins‚ Ford‚ Continental or Deutz Water Pump
#225: Resurfacing Twin Disc Power Take Off Clutch Plates?
#226: Caterpillar to Perkins Cross Reference
#227: Deutz 1011F and 2011 Timing Pins – A Helpful How-To on Where They Go
#228: How to Order a Deutz Electronic Shutoff Solenoid
#229: Ordering a Perkins Turbo: Helpful Hints
#230: Six Handy Tips for Rebuilding your Twin Disc‚ Rockford or WPT Over-Center Clutch
#231: AutoClutch and Stein PTO Discs: Rigid vs Springs? Time to Reconsider?
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source

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TYPE:
TITLE (Notes) — Creators (Authors‚ Editors‚ Publishers‚ Directors‚ Actors‚+) – Source DS
Articles:
Aluminum CareDon CaseyBoatUS
Battery CareDon CaseyBoatUS
Carbon Monoxide = Silent KillerDon CaseyBoatUS
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Deep-Cycle BatteriesDon CaseyBoatUS
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Fuel System MaintenanceDon CaseyBoatUS
Heat ExchangersDon CaseyBoatUS
How Important Is Changing Engine Oil?Don CaseyBoatUS
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Repainting Your OutdriveDon CaseyBoatUS
Replacing a Cooling Pump ImpellerDon CaseyBoatUS
Reserve MinutesDon CaseyBoatUS
Sacrificial AnodesDon CaseyBoatUS
Servicing Your Stuffing BoxDon CaseyBoatUS
Sealant ShorthandDon CaseyBoatUS
VentilationDon CaseyBoatUS
Waterproofing CanvasDon CaseyBoatUS
What Sealant Do You Need?Don CaseyBoatUS
Winterizing Your EngineDon CaseyBoatUS
ZincsDon CaseyBoatUS
300+ Diesel Engine Articlesboatdiesel.com
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
Books:
12 Volt Bible for BoatsMiner Brotherton
12 Volt Doctor's Practical HandbookEdgar J. Beyn
100 Fast & Easy Boat ImprovementsDon Casey
Adlard Coles Book of Diesel Engines‚ TheTim Bartlett
Adlard Coles Book of Outboard Motors‚ TheTim Bartlett
Aluminum BoatbuildingErnest H. Sims
Aluminum Boatbuilding Guide — Glen L. Witt
American Merchant Seaman's Manual : For SeamenSeamen?
Basic Navel ArchitectureKenneth C. Barnaby
Basic Ship Theory — K.J. Rawson & E.C. Tupper
Boat Data BookIan Nicolson
Boat Engines : A Manual for Work and Pleasure BoatsP. J. Bowyer
Boat Improvement Bible‚ TheTarantoga
Boat Maintenance : The Essential Guide — William Burr Jr
Boat Mechanical Systems Handbook — Dave Gerr
Boat Owner's ManualIntertec
Boat Repair Made Easy – EnginesKaufman
Boat Repair Manual‚ TheGeorge Buchanan
Boater's Pocket ReferenceThomas McEwan
Boating 101 : Essential Lessons for BoatersRoger H. Siminoff
Boating Magazine's Powerboater's Guide to Electrical SystemsEdwin R. Sherman
Boating Magazine's Quick & Easy Boat MaintenanceSandy Lindsey
Boatkeeper : … Maintenance‚ Repair‚ and ImprovementGladstone & Bottomley (Eds).
Boatman's Handbook : The New Look-it-up BookTom Bottomley
Boatowner's Fitting Out ManualJeff Toghill
Boatowner's Guide to Corrosion‚ The — Everett Collier
Boatowner's Illustrated Electrical HandbookCharlie Wing
Boatowner's Illustrated Handbook of WiringCharlie Wing
Boatowner's Mechanical & Electrical ManualNigel Calder
Buyers' Guide to Outboard BoatsDavid Pascoe
Care and Repair of Small Marine Diesels‚ TheChris Thompson
Classic Outboard Motor Handbook‚ ThePeter Hunn
Commissioning & DecommissioningPractical Sailor Library
Complete Book of Pleasure Boat Engines‚ TheErnest A. Zadig
Complete Book of Sailboat Buying Vol 1 & 2Practical Sailor
Complete Book of Yacht CareMichael Verney
Complete Guide to Outboard Motor Service & RepairPaul Dempsey
Complete Powerboating ManualTim Bartlett & Simon Collis
Day Skipper for Sail & PowerAlison Noice
Diesel Companion‚ ThePat Manley
Diesel Engine MechanicsWayne A. Kelm
Diesel EnginesJ. W. Anderson
Diesel Troubleshootier — Don Seddon
Diesels Afloat : The Must-Have Guide for Diesel Boat EnginesPat Manley
Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance ManualDon Casey
Electrical Handbook for RVs‚ Campers‚ Vans‚ Boats & TrailersHerb Gill
Electrics AfloatAlir Garrod
Engines Afloat : From Early Days to D-Day Vol 2Stan Grayson
Essential Boat MaintenancePat Manley & Rupert Holmes
Essential Boat Maintenance Manual‚ TheJeff E. Toghill
Fiberglass Boat Design and ConstructionRobert J. Scott
Fiberglass Boat Handbook‚ TheJack Wiley
Fiberglass Boat Repair ManualAllan H. Vaitses
Fiberglass Boat Survey ManualArthur Edmunds
Fiberglass BoatsHugh Du Plessis
Fiberglass Boats : Construction‚ Repair‚ and MaintenanceJohn Roberts
Fiberglass Boats : Construction and MaintenanceBoughton Cobb
Fitting Out : Preparing for SeaJ D Sleightholme
Fitting Out a Fibreglass HullMike Collins
Free energy afloatNan Jeffrey
GammelmotorenValdemar Steiro
Handling Troubles Afloat : What to Do When It All Goes WrongJohn Mellor
Handyman Afloat & AshoreKen Bramham
Home Generator : Selection‚ Installation‚ and RepairPaul Dempsey
How Boat Things Work : An Illustrated GuideCharlie Wing
How to Be A First-Rate First Mate : A Sailing Guide for WomenGloria Sloane
How to Design A BoatJohn Teale
How To Paint Your BoatNigel Clegg
How To Repair Diesel EnginesPaul Dempsey
Inboard Motor InstallationsGlen L. Witt & Ken Hankinson
Inspecting the Aging SailboatDon Casey
Internal Combustion Engines — USCG
Inboard Engine‚ Transmission and Drive Service : ManualIntertec
Kawasaki Jet Ski Shop Manual‚ 1976-1988Ron Wright
Know Your Boat's Diesel EngineAndrew Simpson
Look Inside – Cross-Sections – Ships — Moira Butterfield
Lunatic Express : … Most Dangerous …‚ Boats‚ …Carl Hoffman
MaintenanceTime-Life
Managing 12 Volts : How to Upgrade‚ Operate‚ and TroubleshootHarold Barre
Marine Diesel Engines : Maintenance‚ Troubleshooting‚ and RepairNigel Calder
Marine Diesel Engines : Maintenance & Repair ManualJean-Luc Pallas
Marine DieselsM. David Burghardt & George D. Kingsley
Marine Electrical Care & RepairDavid MacLean
Marine Electrical Electronics BibleJohn C. Payne
Marine Electrical SystemsDIY Boat Owner Magazine
Marine Engine Room Blue BookWilliam D. Eglinton
Marine Engines & PropulsionRanger Hope
Marine Fire Prevention‚ Firefighting and Fire SafetyUS DoC MA
Marine InvestigationsDavid Pascoe
Mauch's Sailboat GuideJan Mauch
Metal Corrosion In BoatsNigel Warren
Mid Size Power BoatsDavid Pascoe
Modern Boat MaintenanceBo Streiffert (Ed)
Motor Boat EnginesAlan C. Wilson
Motorboat Electrical and Electronics Manual‚ TheJohn C. Payne
Oars‚ Sails and SteamEdwin Tunis
Outboard Motors Maintenance and Repair ManualJean-Luc Pallas
Piloting: Seamanship and Small Boat HandlingCharles F. Chapman
Powerboat Care and RepairAllen D. Berrien
Powerboater's Guide to Electrical Systems (Boating Magazine)Edwin R. Sherman
Powerboating : Your First Book for Your First BoatKen Kreisler
Practical Small Powerboat MaintenanceAllen D. Berrien
Preliminary Design of Boats & ShipsCyrus Hamlin
Propeller HandbookDave Gerr r
PulleysChris Oxlade
Quick & Easy Boat Maintenance : 1‚001 Time-Saving TipsSandy Lindsey
Reeds Diesel Engine Troubleshooting HandbookBarry Pickthall
Reeds Outboard Motor Troubleshooting HandbookBarry Pickthall
Replacing Your Boat's Engine (Adlard Coles Manuals)Mike Westin
Run Your Diesel Vehicle on BiofuelsJon Starbuck & Gavin D. j. Harper
Running FixTony Gibbs
RYA Book of Diesel EnginesTim Bartlett
RYA Book of Outboard MotorsTim Bartlett
RYA Diesel Engine HandbookAndrew Simpson
Sailboat Electrics SimplifiedDon Casey
Sailor's Assistant : Reference Data for Maintenance‚ Repair & CruisingJohn Vigor
Seloc Bombardier Sea-doo Personal Watercraft … ManualClarence W. Coles. (T)
Seloc Kawasaki Personal Watercraft‚ 1992-97 Repair ManualJoan Coles
Seloc Yamaha Personal Watercraft … ManualClarence W. Coles
Simple Boat MaintenancePat Manley
Small Boat Engines – Inboard & OutboardConrad Miller
Small Boats for Outboard EnginesWilliam Atkin
Stapleton's Powerboat Bible : How to Buy‚ Equip‚ and Organize …Sid Stapleton
Surveying and Restoring Classic BoatsJ C Winters
Surveying Small CraftIan Nicolson
Take the Mystery Out of Boat MaintenanceLawrence A. Diamond
Theory and Practice of Propellers For Auxiliary SailboatsJohn R. Stanton
This Old BoatDon Casey
Total Boating Manual‚ The : 311 Powerboat EssentialsKevin Falvey
Troubleshooting and Repairing Diesel EnginesPaul Dempsey
Troubleshooting Marine DieselsPeter Compton
Ultimate Boat Maintenance ProjectsScott Smith
Understanding Boat Corrosion‚ Lightning Protection…John C. Payne
Understanding Boat Diesel EnginesJohn C. Payne
What Shape Is She In?. A Guide to the Surveying of BoatsAllan H. Vaitses
Wheel Boats on the MissouriHenry Atkinson
Why Didn't I Thank of ThatJohn & Susan Roberts
Young Sea Officer's Sheet Anchor‚ TheDarcy Lever
Your Boat's Electrical SystemConrad Miller & E. S. Maloney

Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source,

Magazines:,

ANCHOR‚ The — Anchors Aweigh Academy,

DIY Boat Owner – The Marine Maintenance MagazineBoatU.S.Mad Mariner (OoB),

Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source,

Documentation:,

Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source,

Videos:,

Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source,

Websites:,

Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source,

[/table]

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DS = Data Source code

MEDIA TYPE:
Title — Creators (Authors‚ Editors‚ Illustrators‚+) – Source (Publishers‚+) DS
Articles:
Fuel System MaintenanceDon CaseyBoatUS
Servicing Your Stuffing BoxDon CaseyBoatUS
VentilationDon CaseyBoatUS
Forum Posts:
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
Tech Tips:
#24 Ford 300 Industrial Downdraft Carburetors — FoleyEngines
#34 Atomic 4 Carburetors and Pumps — FoleyEngines
#37 Perkins Fuel System Seal Kits — FoleyEngines
#40: Walker Airsep Systems — FoleyEngines
#132 How To Prevent Zenith Carburetor Icing — FoleyEngines
#141 Deutz Diesel Engine Model 1013 Fuel Transfer Pumps — FoleyEngines
#150: How to Identify Deutz 912 Engine Fuel Injectors — FoleyEngines
#160: Deutz Diesel Electronic Shutoff Solenoid Selection — FoleyEngines
#161: Handy Numbers for Perkins Diesel Owners or Rebuilders — FoleyEngines
#162: Cummins B Series Injector Protrusion — FoleyEngines
#166: Block Heaters‚ Glow Plugs‚ and Immersion Heaters for your Perkins‚ Deutz or Ford Industrial Engine — FoleyEngines
#173 How to Remove a Perkins 4.108 Injection Pump in Two Easy Steps — FoleyEngines
#176: 120 Series Electric Actuator — FoleyEngines
#183: How To Install A Lucas CAV/Delphi Pump — FoleyEngines
Books:
Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance ManualDon Casey
Inspecting the Aging SailboatDon Casey
This Old BoatDon Casey
Magazines:
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
Documentation:
Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
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Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source
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2.3.2 – ^ National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) V
2.3.3 – Classification Societies TD
2.3.3 – ^ UK: Lloyd’s Register V
2.3.3 – ^ US: American Bureau of Shipping V
2.4 – Boat Building & Refitting Tools‚+: (Vendors‚ Specs‚ Manuals‚ Recalls‚+) TD
2.6 – Boat Equipment: (Vendors‚ Specs‚ Manuals‚ Reviews‚ Recalls‚+) TD
2.6.1 – Steering & Thrusters TD
2.6.4 – Galvanic Corrosion Protection TD
2.6.5 – Hull Penetrations & Openings: (Thru-Hulls‚ Scuttles‚ Skylights‚ Hatches‚+) TD
2.6.8 – Propulsion Machinery: (Types‚ Configurations‚ Features‚ Control Systems‚+) TD
2.6.8.1 – Engines: (Brands‚ Manufacturers‚ Marinizers‚ Resellers‚+) TD
2.6.8.1 – ^ Engine Detonation caused by Phase-Separation MA
2.6.8.2 – Engine-to-Marine Gear Interfaces: (SAE Specs‚ Damper Plates‚ Jackshafts‚+) TD
2.6.8.3 – Marine Gears: (Reversing‚ Reduction; Mechanical‚ Hydraulic) TD
2.6.8.4 – Shafting: (Propshafts‚ Couplings‚ Seals‚ Bearings‚ Struts‚ Keys‚ Nuts‚+) TD
2.6.8.5 – Propellers TD
2.6.9 – Electrical Systems: DC & AC: (Direct Current‚ Alternating Current‚+) TD
2.6.9.1 – Auxiliary Generators TD
2.6.14 – Tenders T
2.8 – Boat Building‚ Outfitting‚ Refitting & Repair Schools: (Incl. DIY) TD
2.9 – Boat Builders: A∼Z and Vessel Types TD
2.11 – Boat Refitters by Country: (Shipyards‚ Boatyards‚ Riggers‚ Repair Shops‚+) TD
2.11.^ – Boat Refitters: Canada D
2.11.^ – Boat Refitters: United Kingdom D
2.11.^ – Boat Refitters: United States D
2.12 – DIY: Boat Building‚ Outfitting‚ Refitting & Repair. (incl. Maintenance) T
14 – MARINE LAW: TD
14.3 – Insurance Law T
14.4 – Personal Injury T
14.5 – Product Liability T
14.6 – Consumer Protection T
14.8 – Investigators‚ Consultants & Expert Witnesses TD
14.9 – Actual Cases TD
15 – DO-IT-YOURSELF (DIY): T
15.1 – DIY: Boat Building‚ Outfitting‚ Refitting & Repair: (Incl. Maintenance) T
15.3 – DIY: Boat Inspections: (Pre-Purchase‚ Pre-Survey‚ Pre-Sale‚ Pre-Voyage‚ Sea Trials‚+) T
15.4 – DIY: Schools & Classes: (Boat Building‚ Outfitting‚ Refitting‚ Inspecting‚ Repair‚+) TD
16 – MEDIA w/Creator Directory: (Authors‚ Editors‚ Publishers‚+) + Academy eLibrary TD
16.1 – Documentation: (Catalogs‚ Ads‚ SpecSheets‚ Manuals‚ TechVids‚ Bulletins‚ Recalls‚+) TD
16.2 – Books: (Bound‚ eBooks‚+) TD
16.2 – ^ 12 Volt Bible for BoatsMiner Brotherton B
16.2 – ^ 12 Volt Doctor's Practical HandbookEdgar J. Beyn B
16.2 – ^ Adlard Coles Book of Diesel Engines‚ TheTim Bartlett B
16.2 – ^ Advanced Marine Electrics and Electronics TroubleshootingEd Sherman B
16.2 – ^ Boat Engines : A Manual for Work and Pleasure BoatsP. J. Bowyer B
16.2 – ^ Boat Maintenance : The Essential GuideWilliam Burr Jr B
16.2 – ^ Boat Mechanical Systems Handbook — Dave Gerr B
16.2 – ^ Boat Owner's ManualIntertec B
16.2 – ^ Boat Repair Made Easy - EnginesKaufman B
16.2 – ^ Boat Repair Manual‚ TheGeorge Buchanan B
16.2 – ^ Boating Magazine's Quick & Easy Boat MaintenanceSandy Lindsey B
16.2 – ^ Boatkeeper : ... Maintenance‚ Repair‚ and ImprovementGladstone & Bottomley B
16.2 – ^ Boatowner's Guide to Corrosion‚ The — Everett Collier B
16.2 – ^ Boatowner's Illustrated Electrical HandbookCharlie Wing B
16.2 – ^ Boatowner's Illustrated Handbook of WiringCharlie Wing B
16.2 – ^ Boatowner's Mechanical & Electrical ManualNigel Calder B
16.2 – ^ Care and Repair of Small Marine Diesels‚ TheChris Thompson B
16.2 – ^ Complete Book of Pleasure Boat Engines‚ TheErnest A. Zadig B
16.2 – ^ Diesel Companion‚ ThePat Manley B
16.2 – ^ Diesel Engine MechanicsWayne A. Kelm B
16.2 – ^ Diesel EnginesJ. W. Anderson B
16.2 – ^ Diesel Troubleshootier — Don Seddon B
16.2 – ^ Diesels Afloat : The Must-Have Guide for Diesel Boat EnginesPat Manley B
16.2 – ^ Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance ManualDon Casey B
16.2 – ^ Essential Boat MaintenancePat Manley & Rupert Holmes B
16.2 – ^ Essential Boat Maintenance Manual‚ TheJeff E. Toghill B
16.2 – ^ Fiberglass Boat Survey ManualArthur Edmunds B
16.2 – ^ How To Repair Diesel EnginesPaul Dempsey B
16.2 – ^ Inboard Engine‚ Transmission and Drive Service : ManualIntertec B
16.2 – ^ Know Your Boat's Diesel EngineAndrew Simpson B
16.2 – ^ Managing 12 Volts : How to Upgrade‚ Operate‚ and TroubleshootHarold Barre B
16.2 – ^ Marine Diesel Engines : Maintenance‚ Troubleshooting‚ and RepairNigel Calder B
16.2 – ^ Marine Diesel Engines : Maintenance & Repair ManualJean-Luc Pallas B
16.2 – ^ Marine DieselsM. David Burghardt & George D. Kingsley B
16.2 – ^ Marine Electrical Care & RepairDavid MacLean B
16.2 – ^ Marine Electrical Electronics BibleJohn C. Payne B
16.2 – ^ Marine Electrical SystemsDIY Boat Owner Magazine B
16.2 – ^ Marine Engine Room Blue BookWilliam D. Eglinton B
16.2 – ^ Marine Engines & PropulsionRanger Hope B
16.2 – ^ Marine Fire Prevention‚ Firefighting and Fire SafetyUS DoC MA B
16.2 – ^ Metal Corrosion In BoatsNigel Warren B
16.2 – ^ Motor Boat EnginesAlan C. Wilson B
16.2 – ^ Motorboat Electrical and Electronics Manual‚ TheJohn C. Payne B
16.2 – ^ Powerboater's Guide to Electrical SystemsEdwin R. Sherman – Boating Magazine B
16.2 – ^ Reeds Diesel Engine Troubleshooting HandbookBarry Pickthall B
16.2 – ^ Replacing Your Boat's Engine (Adlard Coles Manuals)Mike Westin B
16.2 – ^ Run Your Diesel Vehicle on BiofuelsJon Starbuck & Gavin D. j. Harper B
16.2 – ^ RYA Diesel Engine HandbookAndrew Simpson B
16.2 – ^ Sailboat Electrics SimplifiedDon Casey B
16.2 – ^ Simple Boat MaintenancePat Manley B
16.2 – ^ Small Boat Engines - Inboard & OutboardConrad Miller B
16.2 – ^ Surveying Small CraftIan Nicolson B
16.2 – ^ This Old BoatDon Casey B
16.2 – ^ Troubleshooting and Repairing Diesel EnginesPaul Dempsey B
16.2 – ^ Troubleshooting Marine DieselsPeter Compton B
16.2 – ^ Understanding Boat Diesel EnginesJohn C. Payne B
16.3 – Magazines: (Incl. Articles‚ Back Issues‚+) TD
16.3 – ^ ANCHOR‚ TheAnchors Aweigh Academy M
16.3 – ^ DIY Boat Owner - The Marine Maintenance MagazineBoatU.S.Mad Mariner M
16.3 – ^ PassageMaker M
16.3 – ^ ^ House Call: How To Perform A DIY Diesel Engine TestNigel Calder PassageMaker MA
16.3 – ^ ^ Maintaining A Diesel Engine For The Long Run — Gene & Katie Hamilton PassageMaker MA
16.4 – Videos: (How-to-Tutorials‚ Documentaries‚ Travelogues‚+) TD
16.5 – Websites: (Incl. Articles‚ Forum Posts‚ Tech Tips‚ Tech Notes‚ Social Media‚+) TD
16.5 – ^ Barrington Diesel Club (Engine Specifications and Manuals)BarringtonDieselClub.com W
16.5 – ^ BoatDiesel.comPeter Compton W
16.5 – ^ Lancing Marine W
16.5 – ^ ^ Lancing Marine Engine Swap GuideLancing Marine WA
# – Title – + (Notes) — Creator – Source ?


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FROM Huey: "I agree with my Uncle, I too have found the articles to be very enlightening. They say that it will take about 100,000 articles to cover the full scope that they have envisioned for the website. They have over 20,000 articles so far and that's doing pretty well, but it could take several years to get the rest. I also noticed that many of the Main Topic Pages and some of the article pages are still in the rough draft stage. I guess that they will fill in as they can get volunteers to work on them. But what I can't figure out is why anyone would spend the time writing informative in depth articles just to give away free to this website for publication? What's in it for them?"

FROM Dewey: "Well Huey, to me It looks like most of the articles on this website are written by very informed people, like boating instructors, boat designers, boat builders, riggers, electricians, fitters, marine repair technicians and marine surveyors. Writing such articles helps establish them as knowledgeable professionals. After all, this website was originally created by a school for marine technicians and marine surveyors. The website is growing in content every day. They even had to move to a bigger, more powerful server because the website's traffic has been growing exponentially."

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FROM Daisy: "I'm just so glad that Donald got the boat so we and the boys could enjoy boating — together. And of course all of the girls, April, May, and June, love to be on the water too, especially when that is where the boys are. Oh poor Scrooge, boating is more fun then you could possibly imagine."

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